Category: History and myths

Greek Myth: Polyphemus Cave

You, of course, remember the Homer’s story of Odysseus and the Cyclops Polyphemus. It happened when the people of the king of Ithaca was returning home after the Trojan War. 12 ships landed at night … According to a version—it was the southern coast of Crete. “A fertile island lies slantwise outside the Cyclopes’ harbour, […]

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Pseira, a Minoan island town

Pseira is a small uninhabited island, a couple kilometers off the coast of Crete: opposite Tholos Beach and close to another Minoan center—Mochlos. Translated from Greek, Pseira (Ψείρα) means “louse”: apparently, the outlines of the island reminded this name’s inventors of it. Administratively, Pseira belongs to the community of Sitia in the peripheral unit of […]

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Blue and white flag over Crete

The blue and white Greek flag was first flown over Crete on December 1, 1913 in the Firkas fortress in Chania. This celebration was attended by the Greek King Constantine I (who was a cousin of the Russian Emperor Nicholas II and the British King George V on his paternal side) and Prime Minister Eleftherios […]

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“Accessible Environment” in Ancient Greece

According to a recent statement by archaeologists, the ancient Greeks took care of citizens with disabilities around 2,400 years ago and created ramps in temples. The sanctuaries of Asclepius, which can be reached by entrance ramps, are the most ancient monuments of architecture, built taking into account the needs of disabled persons. Focusing on the […]

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Azogyres or 98 pigeon souls

Crete is surrounded by myths and legends like by the four seas washing it; and there are special places here: for example, the village of Azogyres is full of legends and secrets. The tiny Azogyres, lost in the Cretan mountains somewhere between Sougia and Paleochora, seems ordinary, but they say that you can’t come here […]

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A Cretan against Prince Svyatoslav

The Grand Duke of Kiev Svyatoslav Igorevich became famous as a warlord. He was the father of St. Vladimir, the Red Sun by whom was Christianized the Kievan Rus’. The historian Karamzin called Svyatoslav “the Macedonian of Ancient Russia”. This story, the ending of which is the defeat of the Rus’ people* near the city […]

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What did the legionnaires drink and offer to Christ?

Roman legionnaires knew a lot about wines, and it is believed that thanks to the legion camps that guarded the border along the Rhine from German barbarians, the famous Rhine wines appeared, as there was a steady solvent demand for wine from the legionnaires. In 1985, Markus Junkelmann with 11 reenactors undertook a 22-day long […]

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Like Aphrodite: from the foam of sea

Winter has come, and what to do with dark, long, winter evenings, how not to recall summer? Maybe you were lucky to see on the beaches of Crete a white flower of incredible beauty and tenderness, similar to a small lily. This is a sea daffodil, which is also called a sand lily or a […]

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Oxi Day in Greece

Oxi Day in Greece is a national holyday that commemorates the events of October 28, 1940, and the Greek word όχι means “no” On the night of October 28, 1940, the Italian ambassador transmitted a telegram from Mussolini to the Greek Prime Minister Ioannis Metaxas. Greece was required to let the Italian army enter into […]

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